Garden of the Gods

Shawnee National Forest is a Midwest destination unlike any other. Traverse 403 miles of hiking trails, discover local wineries and craft breweries, and don’t miss the Garden of the Gods.

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n southern Illinois, fields give way to forested hills, rugged bluffs and sweet surprises in Shawnee National Forest.

Outdoor enthusiasts make tracks to Giant City State Park, which gets its name from the steep, carved sandstone cliffs that resemble city streets fit for a giant. Hikers explore miles of trails or gather their gear and tackle rock-climbing and rappelling on the massive bluffs. Giant City Stables leads guided horseback tours along wooded paths. The clear and calm waters of Little Grassy Lake, part of the Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge, are ideal for a day of fishing and boating. For a colorful detour, the quirky Makanda Boardwalk showcases the works of local artisans, including metalwork and gemstone jewelry.

Head for the Forest

My Fall Favorite

Traverse City, Michigan

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The days are warm, the nights are cool, and you won’t find a prettier place to take a color tour. Rolling hills are painted in deep reds, bright oranges and sunny yellows – a striking contrast against the sapphire blue of Grand Traverse Bay.

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Some of the best hiking, biking, fishing and boating is all here.

https://www.traversecity.com/fall/outdoors/

Rock Out!

Enjoy a Unique Experience Full of Indian Lore and Natural Wonders in Delaware, Ohio.

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Formed millions of years ago by the tremendous force of an underground river cutting through solid limestone rock, the Olentangy Indian Caverns today offer an exciting excursion into ancient Indian lore with a maze of beautiful winding passages and spacious underground rooms. There is evidence that the Wyandotte Indians used these caverns as a haven from the weather and from their enemies, the Delaware Indians. One of the large rooms “Council Chamber” is believed to have been used by the Wyandottes for tribal ceremonies. This room contains a large rock table referred to as Council Table.  The first white man believed to have entered the caverns was J. M. Adams, a member of a westbound wagon train that camped nearby in 1821. During the night one of his oxen broke loose and wandered off. In the morning the ox was found dead at the bottom of the entrance to the ancient Indian cavern. After exploring the entrance, Adams carved his name and date on the wall.  The carving still remains but is hard to see due to being partially covered by Flowstone.

Various artifacts found in the caverns indicate that the Indian Council Room was used by Wyandotte Indians for making arrows and other stone implements until as late as 1810.  These items were found when the caverns were opened and some are on display in the Museum.  This remarkable geological wonder is now accessible to everyone from the Museum atop the entrance. Concrete stairways descend 55 feet to the maze of natural passages and rooms occupying three different levels. The second level contains Indian Lover’s Bench, Battleship Rock and The Crystal Room. Fat Man’s Misery is a passage leading to Cathedral Hall and Bell Tower room which is 105 feet below the earth’s surface. Beyond are passages and rooms still unexplored. A fourth level where an underground river is flowing to the Olentangy River has been partially explored but not opened to the public. It is known that the river has formed a lake but its size has not been determined. Many miles of passages have never been explored.

 

http://www.olentangyindiancaverns.com

Woodlands, Wetlands, Prairies and Birds!

Hike the Preserves at Crabtree Nature Center near Chicago, IL.

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With the help of active restoration and natural succession, the 1,182 acre parcel of farmland that has become Crabtree Nature Center has been restored to ecological heath and biodiversity.

Crabtree is known as a birding site.  Up to 270 species have been recorded migrating through the area.  Many have been thrilled to spy a sandhill crane family or spot a flock of hooded mergansers on the lake.

The Peace Garden State

North Dakota Adventure

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PEMBINA GORGE

Whether you prefer hiking, canoeing or kayaking, winding along the bends of the Pembina River through the panoramic Pembina Gorge is a must for any nature lover. Enjoy the recreational, historical and natural scenery opportunities of this scenic North Dakota nook.

Rendezvous RegionWalhalla, ND
Fishing on Lake Sakakawea at dusk.

DEVILS LAKE

Head to the full-service Woodland Resort for unbeatable boating and fishing. The resort also boasts a restaurant, cabins, motel, campground, bait shop and boat rentals, along with a full-service winter ice fishing headquarters with fish house rental and guided ice fishing packages available.

1012 Woodland DriveDevils Lake, ND 58301

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LAKE METIGOSHE STATE PARK

Nestled in the scenic Turtle Mountains on the shores of Lake Metigoshe, this state park includes several miles of rolling hills and multi-use trails. Amazing canoeing, kayaking and fishing opportunities abound on one of the cleanest natural fresh-water lakes in North Dakota. Cabin rentals are available in summer and winter

 

For more info visit https://www.ndtourism.com/best-places/11-great-north-dakota-outdoor-adventures

10,000 Lakes and Counting

Looking for adventure in Minnesota….

  1. Fall colors at Mic Mac Lake in Tettegouche State Park / by Wayne Moran

    Chase the Fall Colors on Minnesota’s North Shore

    It’s always worth visiting the North Shore, but in September and October, the region transforms into a truly magical destination that practically insists on becoming your annual vacation spot.

  2. Boundary Waters SQ

    A Beginner’s Boundary Waters Itinerary: Four Days in Paradise

    One of the hardest things about planning your first Boundary Waters trip is deciding where to go within the vast preserve’s 1,200 miles of canoe routes, 11 hiking trails and approximately 2,000 designated campsites. This four-day itinerary highlights some of the best sights and camping spots along a moderate course, and ends with a hearty dose of small town Minnesota on the final day—a complete “Up North” experience if there ever was one.

  3. Arctic Cat ATV

    Minnesota’s ATV Trails Cater to All Riders

    Minnesota boasts dozens of trails for all-terrain vehicle riders. Opportunities exist for riders throughout Minnesota, with the majority of trails clustered in the northern part of the state. There are trails to match every skill level, from flat and open trails that cater to beginners, to narrow, winding trails that will challenge even the most experienced riders.

  4. Northeast Voyageurs

    Houseboating & More at Voyageurs National Park

    Voyageurs National Park is Minnesota’s only full-fledged national park. It is uniquely water-based among national parks, with its interior accessible only by water. 240 camping, houseboat and day-use sites dot the shores of four large, island-studded lakes, and dozens of smaller lakes, along the Canadian border.

  5. Find Creature Comforts in the Midst of Wild Nature

    Find Creature Comforts in the Midst of Wild Nature

    The Boundary Waters is a true wilderness preserved within Superior National Forest’s 3 million acres, and offers its many visitors an experience of a lifetime. But it isn’t the only place to take in the area’s beauty. Much of the forest shares the BWCAW’s distinctive, rugged beauty.

  6. Voyageurs National Park

    The Big 6: Minnesota’s Spectacular National Park Sites

    Six diverse and unique national park sites can be found in Minnesota, preserving and highlighting some of our most distinctive natural, historical and cultural resources.

     

For more information on these and other ideas visit http://www.exploreminnesota.com/travel-ideas/all-travel-ideas